SETI [Fwd: [seti] Planet-hunters earn Michelson fellowships]


Robert Owen (rowen@technologist.com)
Tue, 05 Oct 1999 14:20:20 -0400


Larry Klaes wrote:

> From: Larry Klaes <lklaes@bbn.com>
>
> >Date: Mon, 4 Oct 1999 17:17:17 -0700 (PDT)
> >From: JPLNews@jpl.nasa.gov
> >Subject: Planet-hunters earn Michelson fellowships
>
> >MEDIA RELATIONS OFFICE
> >JET PROPULSION LABORATORY
> >CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
> >NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION
> >PASADENA, CALIF. 91109 TELEPHONE (818) 354-5011
> >http://www.jpl.nasa.gov
> >
> >Contact: Jane Platt (818) 354-0880
> >
> >FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE October 4, 1999
> >
> >THREE PLANET-HUNTERS EARN NASA'S MICHELSON FELLOWSHIPS
> >
> > High-tech methods to find planets around nearby stars are
> >the focus of three graduate students selected to receive
> >Michelson fellowships offered by NASA's Origins Program and its
> >Space Interferometry Mission.
> >
> > The fellowship program is named for Dr. Albert Michelson,
> >the first American to win a Nobel Prize in physics. He is known
> >as the father of interferometry, a technique that combines and
> >processes light from multiple telescopes to obtain a clear image
> >of distant objects.
> >
> > Interferometry is an essential part of Origins, which
> >includes several missions to study the formation of galaxies,
> >stars, planets and life. The Michelson Fellowship Program is
> >designed to develop expertise in interferometry.
> >
> > "Judges on the independent panel had a hard time selecting
> >the recipients," said Dr. Rudolf Danner of JPL, organizer of the
> >fellowship program. "They were very impressed by the caliber of
> >the applicants and the sophistication of their proposals,
> >especially since they are beginning graduate students. These
> >recipients offer the most promise in terms of technology
> >development and science results they'll help us achieve."
> >
> > Two of the recipients are graduate students at the
> >University of Arizona, Tucson. Philip Hinz was selected for his
> >work on building a new type of nulling interferometer. The
> >instrument will block or "null" the glare from nearby stars so
> >scientists can observe, in infrared wavelengths, the dust and
> >giant planets that may orbit those stars. Erin Sabatke was
> >chosen to work on creating models of large, stretched flat
> >plastic membranes to collect light from several telescopes placed
> >on separate spacecraft and flying in formation. He'll explore
> >the use of this technique to photograph planets around other
> >stars.
> >
> > The third fellowship recipient, Benjamin Lane, is a student
> >at the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA. His work
> >will advance the technique of using two stars with a narrow angle
> >separating them to measure relative motion of one with respect to
> >the other, utilizing a ground-based interferometer. He'll apply
> >this technique to search for planets around other stars being
> >conducted at the Palomar Testbed Interferometer on Palomar
> >Mountain near San Diego.
> >
> > The fellowship, to be awarded annually, is offered for three
> >years of graduate research at the host institution and covers
> >tuition, a student stipend and a small budget for travel and
> >other research expenses. The total cost is $90,000 per student
> >per year. The application deadline for fellowships for the year
> >2000 is December 15, 1999. Information is available at the
> >following website:
> >
> > http://sim.jpl.nasa.gov/michelson
> >
> > JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology,
> >manages Origins for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington,
> >DC.
> >

=======================
Robert M. Owen
Director
The Orion Institute
57 W. Morgan Street
Brevard, NC 28712-3659 USA
=======================



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