Re: SETI Seti Editorial: Communication by Engangled Particles


MarcusJohn@aol.com
Mon, 5 Jul 1999 22:56:38 EDT


In a message dated 7/5/99 12:58:50 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
jebush@ridgecrest.ca.us writes:

>
> Guess I missed the IBM article; do you have a reference?
>

A web search on "quantum teleportation" will turn up a ton of references.
Here is one of the URL's from IBM:

http://www.research.ibm.com/quantuminfo/teleportation/

You will have to read some of these things yourself. You probably won't
believe your eyes.

Here is one of the more interesting paragraphs from the IBM website:

In the 1960s John Bell showed that a pair of entangled particles, which were
once in contact but later move too far apart to interact directly, can
exhibit individually random behavior that is too strongly correlated to be
explained by classical statistics. Experiments on photons and other particles
have repeatedly confirmed these correlations, thereby providing strong
evidence for the validity of quantum mechanics, which neatly explains them.
Another well-known fact about EPR correlations is that they cannot by
themselves deliver a meaningful and controllable message. It was thought that
their only usefulness was in proving the validity of quantum mechanics. But
now it is known that, through the phenomenon of quantum teleportation, they
can deliver exactly that part of the information in an object which is too
delicate to be scanned out and delivered by conventional methods.

A couple of interesting points to make:

1. If the Star Trek teleporter will ever be made, it will most likely be
supplied by a small mom and pop shop known as International Business
Machines.

2. If there is a commercial exploitation of Quantum Mechanics, IBM will be
there.

3. IBM is convinced that FTL action at a distance is a reality.

4. Any technology, sufficiently advanced, is indistinguishable from magic.
(This is paraphrased from my memory of a similar statement by Sir Arthur C.
Clark)

John Marcus.



This archive was generated by hypermail 2.0b3 on Sun Aug 01 1999 - 16:28:41 PDT