SETI Star Stuff


Larry Klaes (lklaes@bbn.com)
Mon, 21 Jun 1999 15:33:51 -0400


>X-Sender: cmcconne@students.wisc.edu >X-Mailer: Windows Eudora Pro Version 2.1.2 >Date: Mon, 21 Jun 1999 14:32:41 -0500 >Reply-To: History of Astronomy Discussion Group <HASTRO-L@WVNVM.WVNET.EDU> >Sender: History of Astronomy Discussion Group <HASTRO-L@WVNVM.WVNET.EDU> >From: Craig McConnell <cmcconne@STUDENTS.WISC.EDU> >Subject: Star Stuff >To: HASTRO-L@WVNVM.WVNET.EDU > >Greetings, > >My star stuff query raised a number of helpful responses, most of which >seemed to come directly to me. In case anyone else out there was >wondering, this was what I was looking for (response courtesy of Holly >Henry, Pennsylvania State University): > >>The "star stuff" quote was used widely it seems in the late 1920s. Harlow >>Shapley and Cecilia Payne may be some of the earliest to use the term. >>Their collection of essays, _The Universe of Stars_ (1929), opens with an >>essay by Shapley titled "What are the Stars?" Shapley writes,"We are, >>therefore, made out of star stuff.. . . In the last analysis, then we feed >>upon sunbeams, we are kept warm by the radiation of the Sun, and we are >>made out of the same materials that constitute the stars." >> >>Cecilia Payne, who worked with Shapley and co-edited the text, also >>includes an essay titled "The Stuff Stars are Made Of". > >Many thanks to all who replied. > >--Craig > >Craig Sean McConnell >UW-Madison, History of Science >cmcconne@students.wisc.edu >



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