archive: SETI [ASTRO] SN 1999ca in NGC 3120

SETI [ASTRO] SN 1999ca in NGC 3120

Larry Klaes ( lklaes@bbn.com )
Thu, 06 May 1999 14:42:24 -0400

How would we be able to tell the difference between a
natural supernova event and an artificial pulsed laser
beacon from an ETI?

>X-Authentication-Warning: brickbat12.mindspring.com: majordom set sender
to owner-astro using -f
>Date: Thu, 6 May 1999 11:35:40 +0900 (JST)
>From: Hitoshi YAMAOKA <yamaoka@rc.kyushu-u.ac.jp>
>To: vsnet-alert@kusastro.kyoto-u.ac.jp, isn_chat@supernovae.net,
> ASTRO@lists.mindspring.com
>Subject: [ASTRO] SN 1999ca in NGC 3120
>Cc: yamaoka@rcsvr.rc.kyushu-u.ac.jp
>Sender: owner-astro@brickbat12.mindspring.com
>Reply-To: Hitoshi YAMAOKA <yamaoka@rc.kyushu-u.ac.jp>
>
>cf. vsnet-chat 1858
>http://www.kusastro.kyoto-u.ac.jp/vsnet/Mail/vsnet-chat/msg01858.html
>cf. vsnet-chart 161
>http://www.kusastro.kyoto-u.ac.jp/vsnet/Mail/vsnet-chart/msg00161.html
>
>Dear SN watchers,
>
> Successive nearby supernova discovery is continuing. Perth team has
>found a new apparent supernova 1999ca in southern face-on Sc galaxy
>NGC 3120, as reported in IAUC 7158.
>
> The location of SN 1999ca is: R.A. = 10h05m22s.92, Decl. =
>-34o12'41".3 (2000.0), which is about 32" north (slightly smaller than
>IAUC value) of the center of NGC 3120, and coincident with the
>northern edge of the optical spical disk. This galaxy is near from
>the Galactic plane (b = 17o.1), so there are many foreground stars,
>but the confusing one isn't there.
>
> The reported magnitudes are;
>19990402 >19
>19990427.55 17:R
>19990430.514 170C .
>
> The recession velocity of NGC 3120 is an order of 3000 km/s, which
>indicates that typical SNeIa on this distance would be 14.5 mag or so
>at their maximum light. Followup observation is encouraged.
>
>Sincerely Yours,
>Hitoshi YAMAOKA, Kyushu Univ., Japan
>yamaoka@rc.kyushu-u.ac.jp
>