archiv~1.txt: SETI "Tour The Cosmos" LECTURE SERIES VIA REALMEDIA WEBCASTING!

SETI "Tour The Cosmos" LECTURE SERIES VIA REALMEDIA WEBCASTING!

Alex Michael Bonnici ( bonnici@ix.netcom.com )
Tue, 23 Mar 1999 03:29:49 -0500

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Hello Gang,
There is a fantastic series of lectures currently being
broadcast via the internet entitled "Tour the Cosmos" which can be found
via the internet by following the following link:
http://hubble.stsci.edu/steiner/current/media.shtml . Information
concerning the series can be found below:

The "Tour the Cosmos" series, sponsored by the Space
Telescope Science Institute, the NASA Public Affairs
Office and WJHU-FM's "Marc Steiner Show," continues
to break new ground in the use of multimedia to
deliver compelling science information to the public.
Available only on the web, the series combines radio
broadcasts, television video and the latest Hubble
Space Telescope images to give viewers an innovative
learning experience that they can visit time and time
again.
The current program in this series is entitled:
http://hubble.stsci.edu/steiner/current/index.shtml

Spinning Stardust into Planets

Astronomers are getting a fresh look at
what may be the early stages of
planetary system formation. Recent
pictures by NASA's Hubble Space
Telescope don't show actual planets,
but rather edge-on disks that provide
some of the clearest views to date of
potential planetary construction zones.
The photos may hold clues to what
happened some 4.5 billion years ago
when the Earth and the other planets
in the Solar System condensed out of a
similar pancake-shaped disk around our
young Sun.

Alex Michael Bonnici
http://www.geocities.com/CapeCanaveral/8505

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;;;;

;;Hello Gang,;
;;           Thereis a fantastic series of lectures currently being broadcast via the internetentitled ";Tour the Cosmos"; which can be found via the internet by followingthe following link: ;http://hubble.stsci.edu/steiner/current/media.shtml;. Information concerning the series can be found below:;;;

;;The ";Tour the Cosmos"; series, sponsored by the Space;
;;             Telescope Science Institute, the NASA Public Affairs;
;;             Office and WJHU-FM's ";Marc Steiner Show,"; continues;
;;             to break new ground in the use of multimedia to;
;;             deliver compelling science information to the public.;
;;             Available only on the web, the series combines radio;
;;             broadcasts, television video and the latest Hubble;
;;             Space Telescope images to give viewers an innovative;
;;             learning experience that they can visit time and time;
;;             again.;
;;The current program in this series is entitled: ;http://hubble.stsci.edu/steiner/current/index.shtml;;;;

;;Spinning Stardust into Planets;;;

;;                    Astronomers are getting a fresh look at;
;;                    what may be the early stages of;
;;                    planetary system formation. Recent;
;;                    pictures by NASA's Hubble Space;
;;                    Telescope don't show actual planets,;
;;                    but rather edge-on disks that provide;
;;                    some of the clearest views to date of;
;;                    potential planetary construction zones.;
;;                    The photos may hold clues to what;
;;                    happened some 4.5 billion years ago;
;;                    when the Earth and the other planets;
;;                    in the Solar System condensed out of a;
;;                    similar pancake-shaped disk around our;
;;                    young Sun.;;;

;;Alex Michael Bonnici;
;;;http://www.geocities.com/CapeCanaveral/8505;;
;;; ;--------------C5C0CB81049138927FF268A0--