archive: Re: SETI Yet another hare-brained scheme for building an antenna

Re: SETI Yet another hare-brained scheme for building an antenna

Noel C. Welstead ( (no email) )
Tue, 01 Sep 1998 08:47:23 +1000

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The biggest problem with this idea is the RFI generated by the
truck that came to take you away. You know, the guy's in the
white coats!!! Grin Grin.

Noel Welstead
Brisbane Australia

Jim Glover wrote:

> >
> >
> >
> > Picture a round, above-ground swimming pool about
> > 14 feet in diameter, filled about half way with water
> > and floating on top of that a coating of aluminized
> > ping-pong balls.
>
> Only one point on the surface of each ping-pong ball
> would reflect radiation in the desired direction. The
> rest of the radiation striking each ping-pong ball
> would be scattered all over the place. Very low
> efficiency.
>
> Suppose you used half a ping-pong ball for each? The
> aluminized surface would be the flat part of the half-
> sphere, which would be parallel to the surface of the
> water, when the water was at rest. However, even this
> wouldn't work as you went up the sides of the curve.
> Each ping-pong ball's flat surface would be pointing
> more or less straight up. (And that's assuming it
> didn't decide to flop over.)
>
> --Jim WB5UDE
>

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The biggest problem with this idea is the RFI generated by the
truck that came to take you away. You know, the guy's in the
white coats!!! Grin Grin.

Noel Welstead
Brisbane Australia
 

Jim Glover wrote:

>
>
>
> Picture a round, above-ground swimming pool about
> 14 feet in diameter, filled about half way with water
> and floating on top of that a coating of aluminized
> ping-pong balls.

Only one point on the surface of each ping-pong ball
would reflect radiation in the desired direction.  The
rest of the radiation striking each ping-pong ball
would be scattered all over the place.  Very low
efficiency.

Suppose you used half a ping-pong ball for each?  The
aluminized surface would be the flat part of the half-
sphere, which would be parallel to the surface of the
water, when the water was at rest.  However, even this
wouldn't work as you went up the sides of the curve.
Each ping-pong ball's flat surface would be pointing
more or less straight up.  (And that's assuming it
didn't decide to flop over.)

--Jim  WB5UDE
 

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