archiv~1: Re: SETI Quantum Communications - An Expert

Re: SETI Quantum Communications - An Expert

Cynthia Wong ( (no email) )
Sat, 7 Nov 1998 00:10:19 -0800

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FYI...
=20
I grew a bit weary of speculating. So for those who are still =
interested in this issue of QM teleportation and possible applications =
for communication, I have corresponded with one of the QM teleportation =
researchers and he was very kind to answer a few of my 'silly' layman's =
questions.

I hope this helps answer a few of your questions too.
=20
Regards,
Brian Wong
bw@logis.com
=20

I asked the following questions to Dr. Hideo Mabuchi, Professor of =
Physics, at the California Institute of Technology and a member of the =
Quantum Optics Group that performed the successful QM teleportation.

Q: Would it possible to use Quantum Teleportation to convey information =
across large distances in place of traditional communication techniques?
=20
A: In the way that it is currently understood, Quantum Teleportation =
could not really be used as a direct substitute for traditional =
communication techniques. In fact, the use of a traditional =
communication channel is required as an essential part of the =
teleportation protocol! [snip...] I should also point out that any =
technological application of these "quantum ideas" lies fairly far in =
the future (at least 10 years hence, in my opinion), due to the extreme =
difficulty of implementing these ideas in the lab.
=20
Q: Can other particles besides photons be teleported?

A: It's important to note that the actual, "physical" particles are not =
themselves teleported -- rather, the quantum state of a particle located =
in one place gets transferred to another particle located somewhere =
else. But given that caveat, there's no reason why the states of =
arbitrary particles (besides photons) can't be transmitted via the =
quantum teleportation protocol.
=20
Q: Are there theoretical distance limitations for teleportation?

A: As far as we know, there are no fundamental distance limitations... =
but the technological difficulty of trying to implement the protocol =
might become prohibitive at some distance scale.
=20
Thank you Dr. Mabuchi!
=20
=20

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FYI...
 
I grew a bit weary of =speculating.  So for=20those who are still interested in this issue of QM teleportation and =possible=20applications for communication, I have corresponded with one of the QM=20teleportation researchers and he was very kind to answer a few of my ='silly'=20layman's questions.
 
I hope this helps answer a few of your questions=20too.
 
Regards,
Brian Wong
bw@logis.com
 
 
I asked the following questions to =Dr. Hideo=20Mabuchi, Professor of Physics, at the California Institute of Technology =and a=20member of the Quantum Optics Group that performed the successful QM=20teleportation.
 
Q:  Would it possible to use =Quantum=20Teleportation to convey information across large distances in place of=20traditional communication techniques?
 
A:  In the way that it is =currently=20understood, Quantum Teleportation could not really be used as a direct=20substitute for traditional communication techniques.  In fact, the =use of a=20traditional communication channel is required as an essential part of =the=20teleportation protocol! [snip...] I=20should also point out that any technological application of these ="quantum=20ideas" lies fairly far in the future (at least 10 years hence, in =my=20opinion), due to the extreme difficulty of implementing these ideas in =the=20lab.
 
Q: Can other particles besides photons be=20teleported?

A:  It's important to note that the actual, ="physical" particles are not themselves teleported -- rather, =the=20quantum state of a particle located in one place gets transferred to =another=20particle located somewhere else. But given that caveat, there's no =reason why=20the states of arbitrary particles (besides photons) can't be transmitted =via the=20quantum teleportation protocol.
 
Q: Are there theoretical distance =limitations for=20teleportation?

A:  As far as we =know, there are=20no fundamental distance limitations... but the technological difficulty =of=20trying to implement the protocol might become prohibitive at some =distance=20scale.
 
Thank you Dr. Mabuchi!
 
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