SETI bioastro: FW: Science News e-Letter

From: LARRY KLAES (ljk4_at_msn.com)
Date: Sat Jul 15 2006 - 07:48:35 PDT

  • Next message: LARRY KLAES: "SETI bioastro: FW: Latest News from the Astrobiology Magazine"

    >From: e-letter_at_lists.sciencenews.org
    >Subject: Science News e-Letter
    >Date: 14 Jul 2006 20:53:31 -0700
    >
    >Weekly e-Letter from Science News
    >July 15, 2006
    >Subject: Science News Weekly e-letter
    >
    >This week's news highlights the puzzling aftermath of a stellar explosion,
    >proposed funding cuts that may close some regional libraries maintained by
    >the Environmental Protection Agency, evidence that meerkat elders teach
    >pups the art of catching dinner, the advantages of soybeans over corn for
    >biofuels, the possibility that household activity may buy elderly people
    >some extra years of life, and more. This week's cover story unveils sensing
    >systems that mimic the way mammalian noses identify smells. A second
    >feature describes the efforts of physicists to make invisibility cloaks.
    >
    >==================================
    >Science News is an award-winning weekly newsmagazine covering the most
    >important research in all fields of science. Published since 1922, its 16
    >pages are packed with short, accurate articles that appeal to both general
    >readers and scientists.
    >----------------------------------
    >Science News for Kids
    >Sun Screen: Too much sun can damage your skin and may lead to skin cancer
    >later in life.
    >http://www.sciencenewsforkids.org/articles/20060712/Feature1.asp
    >==================================
    >
    >This Week's Featured Articles:
    >
    >[Zoology]
    >Live Prey for Dummies: Meerkats coach pups on hunting
    >Meerkats easing their pups into the job of handling live prey are among the
    >few animal species shown so far to be natural teachers. **With audio**.
    >http://www.sciencenews.org/articles/20060715/fob3.asp
    >
    >[Environment]
    >Radiation Redux: Forest fires remobilize fallout from bomb tests
    >A sensor installed to monitor fallout from modern nuclear tests has
    >detected small amounts of radioactive cesium produced by bomb tests decades
    >ago and sent skyward by forest fires.
    >http://www.sciencenews.org/articles/20060715/fob7.asp
    >
    >[Physics]
    >Out of Sight: Physicists get serious about invisibility shields
    >Shields that confer invisibility on objects and people may be on the
    >horizon.
    >http://www.sciencenews.org/articles/20060715/bob9.asp
    >
    >THIS WEEK'S ONLINE FEATURES:
    >
    >[MATHTREK]
    >Flirting with the Impossible
    >A new book champions the importance of imagination and fantasy in
    >mathematics.
    >http://www.sciencenews.org/articles/20060715/mathtrek.asp
    >
    >[FOOD FOR THOUGHT]
    >Farm Fresh Pesticides
    >For people who live near croplands, traces of agricultural chemicals can
    >find their way into homes by hitchhiking on windblown dust.
    >http://www.sciencenews.org/articles/20060715/food.asp
    >
    >[TIMELINE]
    >From the July 11, 1936, issue
    >A new comet, stars as factories, and electricity in blood.
    >http://www.sciencenews.org/articles/20060715/timeline.asp
    >
    >----------------------------------
    >To subscribe to Science News magazine, go to www.sciencenews.org
    >----------------------------------
    >
    >Week of July 15, 2006; Vol. 170, No. 3
    >
    >THIS WEEK'S TABLE OF CONTENTS:
    >http://www.sciencenews.org/articles/20060715/toc.asp
    >
    >References and sources for all articles are available online at
    >www.sciencenews.org
    >
    >***********************************
    >REGISTERED SUBSCRIBERS to the print edition of Science News also have
    >online access to the full text of the following articles:
    >
    >[Science & Society]
    >Close Your Books: Cuts, shutdowns loom for EPA libraries
    >Some regional libraries maintained by the Environmental Protection Agency
    >will permanently shut their doors because of a proposed cut to their
    >funding.
    >http://www.sciencenews.org/articles/20060715/fob1.asp
    >
    >[Astronomy]
    >Explosive Aftermath: Sluggish neutron star puzzles astronomers
    >An X-ray–emitting object at the heart of a young supernova remnant doesn't
    >fit the textbook view of what a stellar explosion is supposed to leave
    >behind.
    >http://www.sciencenews.org/articles/20060715/fob2.asp
    >
    >[Technology]
    >Farm-Fuel Feedback: Soybeans have advantages over corn
    >A new analysis of two biofuels finds that while both provide more energy
    >than they consume, soybean biodiesel gives more bang for the buck than
    >ethanol made from corn.
    >http://www.sciencenews.org/articles/20060715/fob4.asp
    >
    >[Biomedicine]
    >Keep on Going: Busy seniors live longer, more proof that it pays to stay
    >active
    >Healthy elderly people who burn a lot of calories each day may be gaining
    >extra years of life.
    >http://www.sciencenews.org/articles/20060715/fob5.asp
    >
    >[Anthropology]
    >Little Ancestor, Big Debate: Tiny islanders' identity sparks dispute
    >New measurements bolster the 2-year-old claim that fossils of a half-size
    >human ancestor found on an Indonesian island represent a new species.
    >http://www.sciencenews.org/articles/20060715/fob6.asp
    >
    >[Technology]
    >Smells Like the Real Thing: Sensing systems that mimic noses and taste buds
    >Chemical sensors that take cues from the mammalian pattern-based approach
    >to identifying odors and flavors create colorful readouts that even the
    >eyes can distinguish.
    >http://www.sciencenews.org/articles/20060715/bob8.asp
    >
    >[Environment]
    >Warning: Slow down for whales
    >To protect a major population of right whales, the U.S. government is
    >proposing periodic go-slow rules for big ships passing through the animals'
    >migration routes.
    >http://www.sciencenews.org/articles/20060715/note10.asp
    >
    >[Biomedicine]
    >Mad cow disease might linger longer
    >A rare but deadly human illness spread by cannibalism has an incubation
    >period in some individuals of about 4 decades.
    >http://www.sciencenews.org/articles/20060715/note11.asp
    >
    >[Environment]
    >Asbestos fibers: Barking up a tree
    >Sixteen years after a mine with asbestos-contaminated ore shut down, trees
    >in the area still hold hazardous concentrations of wind-deposited asbestos.
    >http://www.sciencenews.org/articles/20060715/note12.asp
    >
    >[Biomedicine]
    >Statins might lower risk of cataracts
    >Cholesterol-lowering drugs called statins might slow the formation of
    >certain types of cataracts in the eye.
    >http://www.sciencenews.org/articles/20060715/note13.asp
    >
    >[Biomedicine]
    >Growth hormone's risks outweigh its benefits
    >Human growth hormone has substantial risks and no functional benefits for
    >healthy, elderly people.
    >http://www.sciencenews.org/articles/20060715/note14.asp
    >
    >[Anthropology]
    >Did small hominids have a genetic defect?
    >Miniature humans whose prehistoric remains were recently unearthed on an
    >Indonesian island may have had a genetic disease known as Laron syndrome.
    >http://www.sciencenews.org/articles/20060715/note15.asp
    >
    >[Biomedicine]
    >Thyroid-hormone mimic lowers LDL
    >A compound in a new class of potential anti-cholesterol drugs has passed an
    >early test in people.
    >http://www.sciencenews.org/articles/20060715/note16.asp
    >
    >[Biomedicine]
    >In utero factors shape responses to stress, sugar
    >Abnormal conditions during pregnancy can lead in unexpected ways to
    >physiological problems in children once they reach adulthood.
    >http://www.sciencenews.org/articles/20060715/note17.asp
    >
    >[Science & Society]
    >Letters from the July 15, 2006, issue of Science News
    >http://www.sciencenews.org/articles/20060715/letter18.asp
    >
    >----------------------------------
    >To subscribe to Science News magazine, go to http://www.sciencenews.org
    >
    >***************************
    >NEW: Science News for Kids!
    >Go to http://www.sciencenewsforkids.org
    >==================================
    >
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    >http://www.audible.com/sciencenews
    >
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    >
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    >==================================
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