SETI bioastro: Fw: Facing Your Genetic Destiny

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From: LARRY KLAES (ljk4@msn.com)
Date: Wed Feb 27 2002 - 06:59:29 PST


----- Original Message -----
From: ScientificAmerican.com
Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2002 3:33 PM
To: ljk4@msn.com
Subject: Facing Your Genetic Destiny

________________________________________________________________
ScientificAmerican.com -- WEEKLY REVIEW February 26, 2002
________________________________________________________________

IN THIS ISSUE
-------------------------
** FACING YOUR GENETIC DESTINY
** LINK BETWEEN MALARIA AND GLOBAL WARMING CHALLENGED
** SULFUR IN RECOVERED SHIPWRECK THREATENS ITS PRESERVATION
** DOUBT CAST ON THEORY OF HOW HUMAN INTELLIGENCE EVOLVED
** ALASKAN SHARK BOOM BLAMED IN PART ON GLOBAL WARMING

Also...ASK THE EXPERTS
** DO PEOPLE LOSE THEIR SENSES OF SMELL AND TASTE AS THEY AGE?
-------------------------

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-------------------------- WEEKLY REVIEW ---------------------------
** FACING YOUR GENETIC DESTINY
In the first part of this series, which appeared last week on our
site, journalist Sergio Pistoi explored the use of predictive genetic
tests in medicine today. In part II, he explains how researchers are
using new techniques to home in on individual DNA differences
associated with common diseases so that in the near future, doctors
will analyze genetic profiles as readily as they now monitor
cholesterol levels.
http://sciam.rsc03.net/servlet/cc?lJpDUWEsqrXFtlgDJhtE0EXXA

** LINK BETWEEN MALARIA AND GLOBAL WARMING CHALLENGED
To the list of predicted outcomes from global warming, researchers
have added a particularly troubling one in recent years: more disease.
Their logic is easy enough to understand. Disease-transmitting
insects--mosquitoes, for example--often flourish in warmer climates.
A recent surge of malaria cases in high-altitude parts of East Africa
seemed to fit neatly with the idea. But a new report asserts that
meteorological data do not support the link.
http://sciam.rsc03.net/servlet/cc?lJpDUWEsqrXFtlgDJhtE0EXXB

** SULFUR IN RECOVERED SHIPWRECK THREATENS ITS PRESERVATION
It might seem that raising a 1,334-ton warship from the bottom of the
ocean would be the most difficult part of preserving the relic for
future museumgoers. But in the case of the Vasa, a 17th century
Swedish shipwreck, a new report indicates that the greatest threat
to the ship's longevity comes from within--in the form of sulfuric
acid.
http://sciam.rsc03.net/servlet/cc?lJpDUWEsqrXFtlgDJhtE0EXXC

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~BOOKSTORE~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
THE BIRDS OF NORTHERN MELANESIA: SPECIATION, ECOLOGY, AND BIOGEOGRAPHY
by Ernst Mayr and Jared Diamond

"In this book we present a comprehensive, detailed study of
speciation for all resident land and freshwater bird species of Northern
Melanesia." Broad as it is, that statement does not fully convey the
solidity of the book or the amount of work and time that went into it.
The encyclopedic result covers 195 bird species on 76 islands of the
Bismarck and Solomon archipelagos, which lie east of New Guinea
and constitute Northern Melanesia. Mayr, the eminent evolutionary
biologist who is professor emeritus of zoology at Harvard University,
has studied Melanesian birds since 1929. Diamond, professor of
physiology at the medical school of the University of California at
Los Angeles (and author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning Guns, Germs,
and Steel, among many other popular books), has made 19 expeditions
to the South Pacific to study birds in pursuit of his interest in
ecology and biogeography.

BUY THE BOOK!
http://sciam.rsc03.net/servlet/cc?lJpDUWEsqrXFtlgDJhtE0EXXZ
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

** DOUBT CAST ON THEORY OF HOW HUMAN INTELLIGENCE EVOLVED
Of all the characteristics that distinguish humans from other
primates, those related to intelligence hold special interest for
scholars and laypeople alike. It's an appropriate enough fascination.
After all, what could be more uniquely human than the desire to
understand how our big, curious, narcissistic brains evolved? That
said, a lot of the story is entirely unknown, and the results of
a new study suggest that some of what scientists thought they knew
may actually require revision.
http://sciam.rsc03.net/servlet/cc?lJpDUWEsqrXFtlgDJhtE0EXYT

** ALASKAN SHARK BOOM BLAMED IN PART ON GLOBAL WARMING
As evidence for global warming accumulates, predictions concerning
its effects are growing in scope and magnitude. Two separate
presentations made at the recent annual meeting of the American
Association for the Advancement of Science in Boston demonstrated
the range of global warming's possible consequences, from a boom in
the shark population in Alaskan waters to a sharper rise in sea level
than previously estimated.
http://sciam.rsc03.net/servlet/cc?lJpDUWEsqrXFtlgDJhtE0EXYU

ASK THE EXPERTS
====================================================
DO PEOPLE LOSE THEIR SENSES OF SMELL AND TASTE AS THEY AGE?
This week's answer comes from Charles J. Wysocki, a neuroscientist
at the Monell Chemical Senses Center in Philadelphia, Penn.
http://sciam.rsc03.net/servlet/cc?lJpDUWEsqrXFtlgDJhtE0EXYV
====================================================

AND REMEMBER...
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