SETI bioastro: Using Computers to Discover Cultural Truths: The Genre Evolution Project

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From: Larry Klaes (larry.klaes@incent.com)
Date: Wed May 30 2001 - 08:27:41 PDT


From: owner-history@lists.hq.nasa.gov
[mailto:owner-history@lists.hq.nasa.gov]On Behalf Of Roger Launius
Sent: Tuesday, May 29, 2001 6:55 AM
To: history@lists.hq.nasa.gov
Subject: NEH Free Lecture, Washington, D.C.

Greetings All:

Readers of this list in the Washington, D.C., area on June 5, 2001, may find
this upcoming free lecture of interest.

Sincerely,

Roger D. Launius
NASA Chief Historian
________________________

NEH EHUMANITIES LECTURE SERIES
Professor Eric Rabkin
"Using Computers to Discover Cultural Truths: The Genre Evolution Project
Studies Science Fiction."
Tuesday, June 5, Noon, Room M-09
Old Post Office, Washington, DC

To register, please see:

http://www.neh.gov/online/ehumanities.html

Technology has changed the way many scholars do their work. In many fields
of science, like genetics, the computer has opened up new worlds of research
that were previously impossible. Can computers also enable humanities
scholars to make the same kind of leap? Please join us for the third
eHumanities lecture to find out how scholars at the University of Michigan
are using computers to help them study how literature evolves over time,
using science fiction as their test case.

Please join us on June 5 at Noon at the Old Post Office to hear Professor
Eric Rabkin from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. Professor Rabkin
has lectured widely, to both general and academic audiences, on fantasy,
science fiction, fairy tales, humor, American literature, literary theory,
culture studies, pedagogy, composition, administration, and information
technology.

His talk at the NEH is entitled "Using Computers to Discover Cultural
Truths: The Genre Evolution Project Studies Science Fiction." The Genre
Evolution Project (GEP) is testing the hypothesis that cultural materials,
like biological organisms in their environments, evolve as complex adaptive
systems. In order to test this hypothesis, the GEP has developed new,
collaborative, computer-based methods that bridge the usual gap between
qualitative and quantitative research. Using the American science fiction
short story as its first test subject, the GEP has made discoveries both in
critical theory in general and in science fiction in specific.

To register and get more details about the lecture, please see:
http://www.neh.gov/online/ehumanities.html


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