SETI bioastro: Fw: [NOVA] "Flying Casanovas"

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From: LARRY KLAES (ljk4@msn.com)
Date: Sat Dec 22 2001 - 20:36:41 PST


----- Original Message -----
From: owner-nova-online@franz.wgbh.org
Sent: Friday, December 21, 2001 12:18 PM
To: nova-online@franz.wgbh.org
Subject: [NOVA] "Flying Casanovas"

NEW FROM NOVA
Friday, December 21, 2001
http://www.pbs.org/nova

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NOVA PRESENTS "FLYING CASANOVAS"

http://www.pbs.org/nova/bowerbirds/

Broadcast: December 25, 2001
(NOVA airs Tuesday on PBS at 8 p.m. Check your local listings.)

When a European naturalist first found small thatched huts in the rain
forest of New Guinea in the late 19th century, he thought they were
built by an unknown tribe of pygmies. In front of each entrance, there
was a neat lawn of moss flanked by decorative beds of pink blossom,
orange fruits, and shining beetle wings. In fact, the builders were not
people but a species of bowerbird. In "Flying Casanovas," host David
Attenborough leads viewers into this little-known world of avian
architecture.

Here's what you'll find online:

    On the Trail of the Bowerbird
    Charles Darwin speculated on the function of bowers, but few
    scientists had conducted studies of these ornate constructions and
    their builders until the University of Maryland's Dr. Gerald Borgia
    began shadowing bowerbirds in 1980. Herewith, his tales from two
    decades in the field.

    Are Bowers Art?
    Bowers in many cases are so meticulously designed, masterfully
    built, and color coordinated that someone seeing them for the first
    time, like that 19th century naturalist, might be forgiven for
    thinking that they were human-made. Do they constitute works of art?
    Send us your thoughts. We'll post selected submissions.

    Creature Courtship
    In the animal kingdom, male bowerbirds are far from alone in going
    out of their way to attract females. Why do males expend such time
    and energy to find a mate? Because of a little force of nature known
    as sexual selection.

    Bowerbird Matching Game (Hot Science)
    Five different species of male bowerbirds have become separated
    from their nests. It's up to you to place each species in its proper
    bower, and to match him with his mate.

Plus Resources and a Teacher's Guide

http://www.pbs.org/nova/bowerbirds/

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